Russia News: Sean’s Russia Blog: Transcript: Lenin’s Government

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Partial transcript of an interview with Lara Douds on the formation, functioning, and decline of the Lenin’s Council of People’s Commissars, or Sovnarkom.

The post Transcript: Lenin’s Government appeared first on Sean’s Russia Blog.

Sean’s Russia Blog

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Russia News: Sputnik International – Breaking News & Analysis – Radio, Photos, Videos, Infographics: ‘Jihadi Bride’ Shamima Begum Was a Member of Daesh Morality Police – Report

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The young woman denied any wrongdoing during her time at the terror group and claimed she was only a “housewife” for her jihadi husband.

Sputnik International – Breaking News & Analysis – Radio, Photos, Videos, Infographics

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Russia News: RT – Daily news: Giant flightless bird RIPS its Florida owner to death with dagger-like talons

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Preview A Florida man has been jumped on and killed by a close relative of the emu, the cassowary, a human-sized flightless bird feared for its great claws and swift powerful movements. The man is said to be a breeder of the exotic birds.
Read Full Article at RT.com

RT – Daily news

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Russia News: Газета.Ru – Новости дня: В Раде обвинили французов времен Киевской Руси в неумении читать

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Глава комитета Верховной рады Украины по международным делам Анна Гопко заявила, что киевская княжна Анна Ярославна привезла Евангелие “не умеющим читать” французам, передает РИА “Новости”.

“Чего только стоит Анна …

Газета.Ru – Новости дня

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mikenov on Twitter: Current News: Voice of America: Migrants Could Benefit From Trump Sanctuary City Idea – The News and Times dlvr.it/R2mhGZ

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Current News: Voice of America: Migrants Could Benefit From Trump Sanctuary City Idea – The News and Times dlvr.it/R2mhGZ


Posted by

mikenov
on Sunday, April 14th, 2019 3:17am

mikenov on Twitter


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Russia News: Lenta.ru : Новости: Зеленский назвал причину нежелания сдать анализы вместе с Порошенко

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Кандидат в президенты Украины Владимир Зеленский не пошел сдавать анализы вместе с Петром Порошенко из-за угрозы провокации. Он рассказал, что его предупредили о возможных действиях в его адрес, однако отказался раскрывать какие-либо подробности, отметив, что «когда-нибудь эта информация всплывет».

Lenta.ru : Новости

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Russia News: Аргументы и Факты: Минфин США сообщил о скором завершении переговоров с Китаем

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В начале апреля президент США Дональд Трамп заявил, что ждет окончания переговоров через четыре недели

Аргументы и Факты

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FBI News Review: “fbi criticism” – Google News: HOLD In Business, Tom Gores is a ‘Three-Point Shooter,’ but in the NBA His Detroit Pistons are Hit and Miss – Deadline Detroit

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HOLD In Business, Tom Gores is a ‘Three-Point Shooter,’ but in the NBA His Detroit Pistons are Hit and Miss  Deadline Detroit

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. – The big TV in the big room in the big building showed the Pistons losing another high-stakes, late-season basketball game back in …

“fbi criticism” – Google News

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Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (82 sites): mikenov on Twitter: mikenov on Twitter: Gobierno de Puerto Rico traiciona educación pública, según diputado dlvr.it/R2mRQH | The News and Times of Puerto Rico dlvr.it/R2mbRT

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mikenov on Twitter: Gobierno de Puerto Rico traiciona educación pública, según diputado dlvr.it/R2mRQH | The News and Times of Puerto Rico dlvr.it/R2mbRT


Posted by

mikenov
on Sunday, April 14th, 2019 2:11am

mikenov on Twitter

Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (82 sites)


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Eurasia Review: ‘Superbugs’ Found On Many Hospital Patients’ Hands And What They Touch Most Often

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For decades, hospitals have worked to get doctors, nurses and others to wash their hands and prevent the spread of germs.

But a new study suggests they may want to expand those efforts to their patients, too.

Fourteen percent of 399 hospital patients tested in the study had
“superbug” antibiotic-resistant bacteria on their hands or nostrils very
early in their hospital stay, the research finds. And nearly a third of
tests for such bacteria on objects that patients commonly touch in
their rooms, such as the nurse call button, came back positive.

Another six percent of the patients who didn’t have multi-drug
resistant organisms, or MDROs, on their hands at the start of their
hospitalization tested positive for them on their hands later in their
stay. One-fifth of the objects tested in their rooms had similar
superbugs on them too.

The research team cautions that the presence of MDROs on patients or
objects in their rooms does not necessarily mean that patients will get
sick with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. And they note that healthcare
workers’ hands are still the primary mode of microbe transmission to
patients.

“Hand hygiene narrative has largely focused on physicians, nurses
and other frontline staff, and all the policies and performance
measurements have centered on them, and rightfully so,” says Lona Mody,
M.D., M.Sc., the University of Michigan geriatrician, epidemiologist and
patient safety researcher who led the research team. “But our findings
make an argument for addressing transmission of MDROs in a way that
involves patients, too.”

Studying the spread

Mody and her colleagues report in the new paper in Clinical Infectious Diseases that of the six patients in their study who developed an infection with a superbug called MRSA while in the hospital, all had positive tests for MRSA on their hands and hospital room surfaces.

In addition to MRSA, short for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus
aureus, the study looked for superbugs called VRE (vancomycin-resistant
enterococcus) and a group called RGNB, for resistant Gram-negative
bacteria. Because of overuse of antibiotics, these bacteria have evolved
the ability to withstand attempts to treat infections with drugs that
once killed them.

Mody notes that the study suggests that many of the MDROs seen on patients are also seen in their rooms early in their stay, suggesting that transmission to room surfaces is rapid. She heads the Infection Prevention in Aging research group at the U-M Medical School and VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System.

Additionally, since many patients arrive at the hospital through the
emergency room, and may get tests in other areas before reaching their
hospital room, it will be important to study the ecology of MDROs in
those areas too, she says.

“This study highlights the importance of handwashing and
environmental cleaning, especially within a healthcare setting where
patients’ immune systems are compromised,” says infectious disease
physician Katherine Reyes, M.D., lead author for Henry Ford Health
System researchers involved in the study. “This step is crucial not only
for healthcare providers, but also for patients and their families.
Germs are on our hands; you do not need to see to believe it. And they
travel. When these germs are not washed off, they pass easily from
person to person and objects to person and make people sick.”

More about the study

The team made more than 700 visits to the rooms of general medicine
inpatients at two hospitals, working to enroll them in the study and
take samples from their bodies and often-touched surfaces as early as
possible in their stay. They were not able to test rooms before the
patients arrived, and did not test patients who had had surgery, or were
in intensive care or other types of units.

Using genetic fingerprinting techniques, they looked to see if the
strains of MRSA bacteria on the patients’ hands were the same as the
ones in their rooms. They found the two matched in nearly all cases –
suggesting that transfer to and from the patient was happening. The
technique is not able to distinguish the direction of transfer, whether
it’s from patient to objects in the room, or from those objects to
patients.

Cleaning procedures for hospital rooms between patients, especially
when a patient has been diagnosed with an MDRO infection, have improved
over the years, says Mody, and research has shown them to be effective
when used consistently. So lingering contamination from past patients
may not have been a major factor.

But the question of exactly where patients picked up the MDROs that
were found on their bodies, and were transmitted to the surfaces in
their rooms, is not addressed by the current study and would be an
important next step based on these results.

Why MDROs matter

Also important, says Mody, is the fact that hospital patients don’t
just stay in their rooms – current practice encourages them to get up
and walk in the halls as part of their recovery from many illnesses, and
they may be transported to other areas of the hospital for tests and
procedures.

As they travel, they may pick up MDROs from other patients and staff, and leave them on the surfaces they touch.

So even if a relatively healthy person has an MDRO on their skin,
and their immune system can fight it off if it gets into their body, a
more vulnerable person in the same hospital can catch it and get sick.
The researchers are exploring studying MDROs on patients in other types
of hospital units who may be more susceptible to infections.

Patients and staff may also get colonized with MDROs in outpatient
care settings that have become the site of so much of American health
care, including urgent care centers, freestanding imaging and surgery
centers, and others.

Mody and colleagues are presenting new data about MDROs in skilled
nursing facilities at an infectious disease conference in Europe in
coming days. They showed that privacy curtains – often used to separate
patients staying in the same room, or to shield patients from view when
dressing or being examined – are also often colonized with superbugs.

“Infection prevention is everybody’s business,” says Mody, a
professor of internal medicine at the U-M Medical School. “We are all in
this together. No matter where you are, in a healthcare environment or
not, this study is a good reminder to clean your hands often, using good
techniques–especially before and after preparing food, before eating
food, after using a toilet, and before and after caring for someone who
is sick– to protect yourself and others.”

Eurasia Review


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Eurasia Review: Opioid Epidemic May Have Cost US Governments $37.8 Billion In Tax Revenue

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The opioid epidemic may have cost U.S. state and federal governments
up to $37.8 billion in lost tax revenue due to opioid-related employment
loss, according to Penn State researchers.

Additionally, the researchers found that Pennsylvania was one of the
states with the most lost revenue, with approximately $638.2 million
lost to income and sales tax. The study looked at data between 2000 and
2016.

Joel Segel, assistant professor of Health Policy and Administration, said that the results — recently published in the journal Medical Care — could help governments that are hoping to make up for lost revenue.

“This is a cost that was maybe not thought about as explicitly
before, and a cost that governments could potentially try to recoup,”
Segel said. “Instead of focusing on the cost of treating people with
opioid use disorder, you could think about it in terms of a potential
benefit to getting people healthy, back on their feet, and back in the
workforce.”

Previous research estimated that in 2016 there were nearly 2.1
million Americans with an opioid use disorder, and approximately 64,000
deaths were the result of an opioid overdose. According to the National
Institute on Drug Abuse, there were 2,235 opioid-related overdose
deaths­­­ in Pennsylvania alone.

Segel said that while previous studies have looked at the cost of
the opioid epidemic in terms of substance abuse treatment and other
medical costs, he and the other researchers were interested in exploring
other costs that may not have been captured before.

“We wanted to take a systematic approach to how we could think about
some of the tax revenue that is lost if someone is unable to work due
to opioid use,” Segel said. “This could be an important consideration
for either state or federal budgets.”

The researchers used data from the National Survey on Drug Use and
Health, as well as information from a previous study that estimated
declines in the labor force due to the opioid epidemic. They used the
TAXSIM calculator from the National Bureau of Economic Research to
estimate losses in tax revenue.

After analyzing the data, the researchers found that from 2000 to
2016, there was an estimated decline of 1.6 million participants in the
labor force, with about 68,000 of those in Pennsylvania. There were
about 180,000 overdose deaths, with approximately 6,100 occurring in
Pennsylvania.

Additionally, the researchers estimated losses of $11.8 billion to
state governments and $26 billion to the federal government in tax
revenue due to reductions in the labor force. For state governments,
this included lost sales tax and income tax revenue. Losses to the
federal government were entirely due to lost income tax revenue.

Segel said the results help show the value of treating people with
opioid use disorder, and should be considered when treatment programs
are being considered and evaluated.

“The state of Pennsylvania has been developing some innovative
programs, and our results are something to consider as these programs
are being considered for implementation,” Segel said. “Not only are
treatment programs beneficial to the individual and to society, but if
you’re thinking about the total cost of these treatment programs, future
earnings from tax revenue could help offset a piece of that.”

Eurasia Review


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Eurasia Review: Azerbaijan To Export Hazelnuts To Latvia

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By Sara Israfilbayova

The Azerbaijani company Azhazelnut signed a contract with Latvia’s Alisco for the export of hazelnuts to Latvia worth $250,000, Trend reports referring to the Ministry of Economy of Azerbaijan.

According to the ministry, as part of the export mission of
Azerbaijan to Riga, a preliminary agreement was also reached on the
export of pomegranate products between Azerbaijan’s Mars Fk and the
Latvian firm Auglu Serviss.

“In addition, a number of Azerbaijani companies participating in the
export mission held talks with Indian and Latvian companies and
supermarket chains on the export of products,” the report said.

The export mission included 23 Azerbaijani companies engaged in the
production of wine and other alcoholic beverages, the production of food
and textiles, as well as tourism.

The export mission that began on April 7 was concluded on April 12.

Eurasia Review


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Eurasia Review: Dictators Striving To Be Thinkers And Writers – OpEd

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By Jonathan Power*

“Since the days of the Roman Empire”, Daniel Kalder wrote in his book ‘The Infernal Library’, “dictators have written books, but in the twentieth century there was a Krakatoa-like eruption of despotic verbiage, which continues flowing to this day.”

It’s
a strange thing but true that many dictators began their working lives
as writers “which probably goes a long way towards explain[ing] their
megalomaniac conviction in the awesome significance of their own
thoughts.”

Lenin
was the father of twentieth century dictator literature. He relied on
the inspiration of Marx. Sitting in the comfort of his mother’s big,
comfortable, house he translated “The Communist Manifesto”. Marx was
then not well known – in 1883 only eleven people had turned up at his
funeral. Contrary to Lenin and Stalin’s books and articles, Marx and
Engels (his co-writer) had written a mesmerizing piece of work. In
contrast Das Kapital was dense and over theoretical.

When
he was exiled to Siberia by the Tsar Lenin read vociferously and wrote a
500-page book. The prose was tedious. The book failed to sell well.

Freed,
he went to live in Switzerland where he wrote the highly influential
book, “What Is To Be Done?” It made his reputation. His many barbs are
directed not against capitalism or the Tsar but against other Marxists.
It was elitist, arguing that the proletariat could not evolve into a
revolutionary force by itself. Workers should submit to the guidance of
ideologically pure radical intellectuals. Stalin, living in Georgia,
read it and was inspired.

Lenin kept on writing for the rest of his life. Even in power he thought that writers could alter reality.

Stalin
who inherited the crown was also a big-time writer, even though he was
the son of an illiterate, drunken, father. He was attracted to
Christianity and his mother sent him to the seminary where he learnt to
read and write poetry. He had a sophisticated taste in books and did
well in the seminary. His poems soon began to be published and are rated
by scholars to be good.

He
also read Marx and Lenin. He lost his religious faith and started to
contribute articles to a Marxist newspaper. He was a popularizer. He
appeared to be a compassionate man, loving oppressed peoples. He had
empathy. In contrast Lenin, ensconced on his mother’s estate, turned his
back on starving peasants, Stalin hadn’t yet discovered his capacity
for wickedness. Unlike Lenin, Stalin had to practice before becoming a
monster.

Stalin
wasn’t a great thinker. After the Revolution he cranked out
insubstantial articles for Pravda. Later, after Lenin’s death, he did
write an important, accessible, work, “The Foundations of Leninism”. He
found time, even in the midst of war, to keep on writing. He downplayed
Lenin’s expectation of a swift transition to a “super revolutionary”
period. Stalin was also a man of culture who loved classical music and
the theatre. (Read Julian Barnes’s novel, “The Noise of Time” which
describes the intimate relationship between Shostakovich and Stalin.)

Hitler
was also cultured. He was a friend of Wagner’s widow. He liked
Mendelssohn, even though he was Jewish. Although he was turned down by
the art school in Vienna his paintings are not at all bad. He spent his
time in prison reading books, even by Jewish writers. In Bavaria he
began to move in literary circles. But when it came to writing Mein Kampf
he over-wrote and badly too. He tried to pretend he was a great
thinker. He wasn’t. He had trouble finding a publisher and it didn’t
sell well. Even he admitted it wasn’t a good book. But he found he was a
great orator and gave up writing.

Mao,
who killed many more people than did Hitler or Stalin, was truly an
intellectual, as Henry Kissinger who talked with him many times, has
said. Before he got involved in politics he worked as a librarian.

He
wrote a less than gripping book, “Report on an investigation of the
Peasant Movement in Hunan.” Then a quite good book, “A Single Spark Can
Start a Prairie Fire”. Unlike Lenin and Stalin, he saw the peasantry as
the force that would push forward a revolution. Later Mao would succumb
to the labored prose of Marxist theory. His Cultural Revolution
decimated all forms of artistic endeavor. Instead, one billion copies of
“Quotations from Chairman Mao” were circulated.

Nearly
all the big time twentieth century dictators had the writing bug: 
Kemal, Mussolini, Franco, Amin, Nasser, Gaddafi, Ceausescu, Kim Il-sung,
Brezhnev, Khomeini, Andropov, Castro and Saddam Hussein. All of them
were prose writers, some poets, and all convinced themselves that
however busy they were with running a country they had to take time off
to compose words.

On
some days Vladimir Putin, Theresa May and Donald Trump seem to want to
be dictators. Thankfully they show no inclination to write. May it
continue like that!

Note:
Jonathan Power was for 17 years a foreign affairs columnist and
commentator for the International Herald Tribune. Copyright: Jonathan
Power. Website
www.jonathanpowerjournalist.com.

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Eurasia Review: Charting A Way Forward In Sudan’s Unfinished Transition – Analysis

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Late at night on 10 April, after defying the most sustained protest movement in Sudan’s modern history for months, Omar al-Bashir finally lost his hold on power. In an early afternoon announcement on state television the next day, Lieutenant General Ahmed Awad Ibn Auf, Sudan’s defence minister and vice president, confirmed the rumours that had been swirling in Khartoum: the security forces had ousted the president and, he said, placed him in detention. Bashir, who took power in 1989 and was one of Africa’s longest-ruling strongmen, would rule no longer.

Reaction to this news has been mixed. Initially rapturous at the fall of an authoritarian figure whose tenure was stained by major human rights abuses,
economic decline and entrenched corruption, protesters soon expressed
disappointment at the terms of the handover the defence minister laid
out. Ibn Auf announced that a military council would take charge of the
country for two years. He also dissolved the government, suspended the
constitution and ordered a three-month state of emergency. Many
protesters had demanded a civilian-led transitional authority; in their
eyes, the regime seemed to be trying to preserve itself under the guise
of a coup.

It is thus apparent that the transition remains incomplete. The protesters’ ranks in Khartoum have continued to swell, with campaigners demanding more substantive change. Protester anger was captured in a new slogan declaring that “the revolution has just started”. Where before they chanted the “regime must fall”, thousands of protesters who marched on the streets in sweltering heat after the army announcement declared in a new chant that “the regime has not yet fallen”.

The protest movement that began on 19 December has already notched an
impressive achievement in compelling Bashir’s ouster. The peaceful
campaign has drawn participants from nearly every stratum of society.
Women have been prominent throughout. The urban middle classes have
joined with farmers and herders to stage near-daily protests not just in
the capital but also in smaller cities and rural villages. Traders,
students and a cross-section of professionals, notably doctors, have all
backed the campaign. Ruling-party supporters, including in the regime’s
traditional strongholds, joined opposition activists in the marches. At
the four-day, 24-hour sit-in outside the military headquarters that
tipped the scales against Bashir, Sudan’s tapestry of religious and
ethnic diversity was on vivid display, with members of Sufi orders
mingling with Christians and singing together late into the night.
Thousands of protesters have paid a high price, including imprisonment,
torture and death, for their participation.

A number of factors explain the protesters’ impressive staying power
and the authorities’ eventual decision to respond – up to a point – to
the calls for change. First, discontent is widespread over the country’s
economic crisis, which entails runaway inflation, crippling shortages
of essentials including fuel and a currency crunch. All but the
wealthiest Sudanese have felt the pinch. The government’s ill-judged
attempt to increase the price of staples such as bread sparked the
initial street actions that soon became a popular uprising. Secondly,
many young Sudanese view their elderly leaders as representing a
self-dealing, kleptocratic order focused on its own survival and
unresponsive to their needs and aspirations. Thirdly, the security
forces have themselves fractured, with mid- and lower-ranking soldiers
joining with the protesters, making clear that the regime’s base has
spindly legs. Ibn Auf reportedly delayed the announcement of a
transitional military council for hours because many younger military
officers were demanding a full handover to civilian hands. Bashir’s
senior security sector allies had to intervene. Reportedly, the
intervention was eventually announced after Ibn Auf, intelligence chief
Salah Abdallah Gosh and head of the Rapid Support Forces militia Mohamed
“Hemeti” Hamdan Daglo stitched together a backroom agreement to push
Bashir aside.

Protesters are right to be sceptical of the ruling elite’s intentions.
Ibn Auf, who will head the transitional military council, hardly
represents a break with the past. He is one of Bashir’s most trusted
confidantes, having been in his circle since 1989. He is allegedly
complicit in some of the worst abuses in Darfur, where the regime’s
scorched-earth campaign against rebels beginning in 2003 left between
200,000 and 300,000 people dead and 2.7 million displaced. The U.S.
State Department placed Ibn Auf, who was head of military intelligence
at the time, on a sanctions list in 2007. Some in the protest movement
accordingly perceive the announced change as a game of musical chairs.
As one protester told
reporters in Khartoum, in a refrain that has repeatedly been voiced
among the crowds: “They just replaced one thief with another”. Nor is it
lost on many Sudanese that Bashir’s camp has played this game before.
In 1989, when Bashir took power in a bloodless coup, he claimed to have
detained one of his closest advisers, the National Islamic Front leader
Hassan Turabi, in what was later revealed as an effort to disguise the
putsch’s Islamist nature.

As Crisis Group has stressed
since the protests broke out, many risks attend a political transition
in a critical country in one of Africa’s more conflict-scarred
neighbourhoods. To preserve his grip on power, Bashir kept the security
forces fragmented. The danger of fighting among disparate armed groups
in the event of a chaotic breakdown is high. Already, there are credible reports
of clashes between elements of the army, who are more sympathetic to
the protesters, and the loyalist National Intelligence Security
Services. To smooth the transition, several steps will be required:

  • A first priority is to prevent further violence. Since December,
    security forces have repeatedly fired on protesters, killing dozens. In
    announcing Bashir’s ouster, Ibn Auf declared a 10pm to 4am curfew. In
    effect, he was ordering the thousands of protesters outside the military
    headquarters to go home. Sudanese authorities must not attempt to
    disperse the demonstrators by force. Such a move would be not only
    bloody but counterproductive. A lesson from the last four months is that
    repression – including Bashir’s 22 February order banning public
    gatherings and opening the door for mass roundups of protesters – has
    done little to change the course of the protest movement. Authorities
    should avoid violence and instead seek to reach an accommodation with
    protest leaders on the way forward.
  • More broadly, Sudan’s generals should rethink their outlined plan to
    rule by extra-constitutional fiat for two years. An African Union
    declaration adopted in 2000 expressly forbids military coups as
    unconstitutional changes of government. Unless the security forces
    quickly hand over power to a civilian-led transitional authority, the AU
    should suspend Sudan’s membership and follow up with sanctions. The
    leadership of the country’s security organs should see a clear
    self-interest in avoiding such ostracism by giving the reins to
    civilians. If they do not, protests will continue, raising the spectre
    of an ugly confrontation that could plunge the country into the deeper
    turmoil they say they are intent on averting.
  • Demonstrators should form an umbrella group and put its leaders
    forward to negotiate with the military council. Up to this point,
    protesters have been understandably unwilling to reveal their leaders’
    identities given the security forces’ brutal record; they arrested and
    reportedly tortured the Sudanese Professionals Association leaders who
    issued public statements in January. With the transition having picked
    up pace, they should now change tack.
  • Ensuing talks should lead to a transitional authority along the lines Crisis Group has advocated
    since 2012: civilian leadership that includes members of the
    opposition, the ruling party and civil society; a defined period of
    constitutional reforms; and, at the end, free and fair elections.
    Without such a transition, Sudan should not receive the assistance from
    international financial institutions that it desperately needs to emerge
    from its economic doldrums.

International actors, viewed by protest leaders as having been lamentably quiet as campaigners braved police bullets, torture and arrests, need to weigh in more vocally and forcefully to achieve these goals and do everything possible to ensure protest leaders that do identify themselves come to no harm. The U.S. and EU, which both maintain ties with elements of the administration in Khartoum, should clearly warn against a violent crackdown and signal that individual commanders will face sanctions should they allow it. They should make clear that economic and other forms of cooperation with Sudan depend on genuine transfer of power to a civilian leadership. In a statement hours before the coup was announced, the U.S., UK and Norwegian governments called for an “inclusive dialogue” and asked Sudanese authorities to respond to protesters’ demands in a serious and credible way. They and others, including the EU, should follow that public message with behind-the-scenes diplomacy with the generals now in charge in Khartoum. Their message should be that greater repression will carry the price of continued isolation and will prevent Sudan from addressing the long-term economic and political crises underpinning the unrest. Sudan’s other partners, notably Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates, likewise should encourage the military leadership to avoid a crackdown that would provoke further unrest and instability.

Sudan sits at a strategic corner of Africa, surrounded by neighbours facing internal difficulties of their own. Not least of these is South Sudan, for whose peace agreement Sudan remains an important guarantor. Other adjacent states – Egypt, Libya, Chad, the Central African Republic, Ethiopia and Eritrea – will also watch developments anxiously. Should Sudan descend into chaos, the turmoil could spill across borders. Sudan’s partners ought to move quickly to persuade military authorities in Khartoum to heed the Sudanese people’s call and allow for a credible, inclusive, broad-based transition to steer Sudan to greater stability after Bashir’s long, chequered and bloody tenure.

Source: International Crisis Group

Eurasia Review


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